Lewis Lillie Model 1

Up

Lillie's patent number 193,9373 dated August 7, 1877 and drawings concerning this time lock

                                                              

Lewis C. Lillie Model 1, 1877. Lillie was a maker of safes and locks, but smaller than his larger competitors of Sargent and Greenleaf, Yale and Hall. The movement is based on a Seth Thomas double spring, eight day movement used in their marine chronometer model. It was the first lock to feature 'calendar work' where the lock could skip a scheduled opening on any given day. The calendar design was also adopted by in Yale's Sunday Attachment in their Model 1 a year earlier, but it operated only every seventh day and was not selectable. Mosler and Stewart introduced their own versions in 1878. There are three known examples of the Model 1, each being unique indicating that this may have never  reached a final design and commercial application before the introduction of their Model 2 1878. It appears that Lillie never went into production of either of their two models due to patent litigation by Yale, a common practice in the time lock business in an effort to protect the lucrative margins and servicing contracts that these devices ensured. An emergency opening provision was also used by the Holms Electric Time Lock Co. even though their time locks had the redundancy of two movements, but theirs was driven electrically rather than mechanically. Their rationale was for the event that violent force was used to open the door and deranged the time lock; the time lock could still be bypassed. (1) file 182

(1) American Genius Nineteenth Century Bank Locks and Time Locks, David Erroll & John Erroll, pg 178-179.

 

Up