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Below are the initial steps of disassembly and cataloging. Total parts count was 339, about the same as what would be expected in a full sized three train tower clock. Afterward everything is cleaned in the ultrasonic machine. The part shown in the tank is the hour strike count wheel. Compare it's size to the full sized version of this same part from a conventional Gourdin tower clock.

Gourdin miniature r.JPG (1075884 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (1).JPG (972149 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (2).JPG (994796 bytes)

Gourdin miniature r (3).JPG (974420 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (5).JPG (1093764 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (6).JPG (1271318 bytes)

Gourdin miniature r (56a).JPG (1300609 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (59a).JPG (1191404 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (60a).JPG (949344 bytes)

One interesting thing found during disassembly was the discovery of a complete inner spring barrel inside each of the two strike barrels. Why this was done is unknown. Perhaps a large enough spring to fill the outside barrel was unavailable?

Gourdin miniature r (21a).JPG (881218 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (22a).JPG (965298 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (20a).JPG (991806 bytes)

A prior repair person had decided to etch many of the parts with identification. Apparently oblivious as to whether one could see his 'handiwork' after the clock had been re-assembled. Bad practice! The left hand barrel in the third shot had a myriad of indelible fingerprints on it's end cap.

Gourdin miniature r (17a).JPG (1139447 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (23a).JPG (1021545 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (58a).JPG (1156039 bytes)

If one decides to lacquer the parts of a clock, it is necessary to mask off all areas that need to be free from the lacquer. This is a laborious job, nearly as time consuming as the polishing itself. However, if done properly, the beautiful finish will last long after an unprotected surface has begun to dull. Often when a taper pin is present I leave the pin in. This protects the hole from being filled with lacquer, altering the tolerance for the pin, and allows  only the portions that show to be covered, (1). Notice that wheel teeth and pinions are covered (2 & 3). It is not necessary to have the tape follow the tooth profile all the way to the root. Covering the surface and spraying on a 45 degree angle radially from the center will prevent the spray from touching the inner tooth surfaces. Parts with holes have to be pegged, as in the 3rd and 4th shots. Notice in the 5th shot I lacquer with the frame parts assembled. This allows a perfect fit in areas that could effect proper wheel depthing if there was a layer of coating on both the frame bed and the under the bearing block or frame plate foot. It's likely that this would not be a problem, but why take the chance? On larger movements this is unnecessary. It takes extra care to do larger built-up parts to get the spray everywhere evenly on the first pass. The last shot shows the completed frame assembly. Notice I am using gloves at this point. While technically unnecessary as the parts are lacquered I still want everything as pristine as possible and after lacquering all parts are never touched by bare hands again.

Gourdin miniature r (19a).JPG (992578 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (37a).JPG (1129133 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (38a).JPG (1236823 bytes)

Gourdin miniature r (25a).JPG (1097739 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (61a).JPG (1167967 bytes) Gourdin miniature r (18a).JPG (997089 bytes)

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